Webinar Series

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:

The “Strong Black Woman Syndrome” and Generational Trauma: What Counselors Need to Know!

Dr. Kristy Christopher-Holloway, LPC, NCC, DCC, CPCS, ACS

Thursday, April 25, 2019 from 6:00 pm – 7:00pm EST

Dr. Kristy Christopher-Holloway is an Assistant Professor, the founder and director of New Vision Counseling Center, LLC, and founder of New Vision Consulting and Training, LLC.  She is a Licensed Professional Counselor, a National Certified Counselor, a Distance Credentialed Counselor, a Counselor Supervisor, and certified in Perinatal Mental Health.  She works with minority women experiencing infertility trauma, birth trauma, pregnancy and infant loss, and issues related to maternal mental health.  Dr. Christopher-Holloway presents regionally, nationally, and internationally with focuses on African Americans and mental health, the psycho-emotional impact of infertility in African American women, maternal mental health, the strong Black woman syndrome, generational trauma, and more.

Session Summary:

African American women experience similar rates of mental illness compared to their counterparts to other ethnicities yet seek treatment at lower rates.  Cultural factors such as the “strong Black woman syndrome”, and the use of informal approaches to mental health treatment impact the help-seeking behaviors and experiences of African American women.  Additionally, historical and generational traumas can lead to internalized oppression, impacting help seeking behaviors among this population.  When working with African American women who may identify as the “Strong Black Woman”, it is important for mental health practitioners to recognize the potential implications, stigmatization, and trauma impact.

Learning Objectives

  • Gain an understanding of the SBW Syndrome and generational trauma.
  • Understand how the SBW syndrome may impact Black women’s mental health.
  • Understand how this client may present to counseling and what treatment issues may present.
  • Learn effective clinical strategies when working with clients who present with SBW Syndrome.

Past Webinar Series

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:

Stereotype Threat Among Underrepresented Students in STEM

Dr. Cirecie West-Olatunji

Thursday, March 21, 2019 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm EST

Dr. Cirecie West-Olatunji currently serves as associate professor in Counseling at Xavier University of Louisiana (XULA), director of the XULA Center for Traumatic Stress Research, and is a past president of the American Counseling Association (ACA). Internationally, Dr. West-Olatunji has provided consultation and training in southern Africa, the Pacific Rim, and Europe. She is also a past president of the Association for Multicultural Counseling & Development, a division of ACA. A graduate of Dartmouth College, Dr. West-Olatunji received her master’s and doctoral degrees in counselor education from the University of New Orleans.

Session Summary: 

Stereotype threat describes a condition in which students’ belonging to a group has been stereotyped causing the student to suffer an additional cognitive or emotional burden that is not seen in students outside the stereotyped group. The presenter of this webinar will discuss the psychological consequences of stereotype threat, such as maladaptive levels of arousal, negative emotional regulation, and cognitive depletion. Using the results from a study funded by the National Science Foundation, the presenter will present findings on an exploration of stereotype vulnerability, sense of belonging, and students’ self-confidence as STEM learners.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and AAPI Presents:

Mindfulness and Narrative Techniques for Addressing Asian American Issues in Counseling

Dr. Monica P. Band, Ed.D., CRC, NCC

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019 from 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm EST

Monica P. Band, Ed.D., CRC, NCC is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Marymount University, Virginia Counselors Association President, Member of the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Presidential Task Force: Cultural Encounters, Member of the Association for Adult Development and Aging Emerging Adult Task Force, and Member of the ACA’s Branch Development Committee. Her general research interests include multicultural counseling and pedagogy, career development, Asian American issues, multicultural identity development, application of clinical practice working with biracial/ethnic and multiracial/ethnic populations. Her professional experiences include: residential counseling services, rehabilitation state agency services, community outpatient settings, crisis response services, and, most recent, individual/couples counseling in a private practice setting. She is the recipient of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development’s 2018 Exemplarity Diversity Leadership Award as well as the 2018 Humanitarian and Caring Person of the Year Award by the Prince William County Regional Counselors Association. She continues to contribute to the profession through service, leadership, and contributing to peer-reviewed publications and referred personations at the international, national, regional, and state levels. She is a co-host of the CounselorAudioSource 2.0 Podcast on the PodTalk Network.

Session Summary:

Attendees during this presentation can expect practical examples of applied techniques to clients who identify as Asian American and have issues related to their cultural identity development. Specifically, Dr. Band will provide examples using mindfulness and narrative techniques, of which she has experience in practicing with Asian American clients. Issues related to acculturation, model minority myth, intraethnic othering, power/privilege dynamics, multiple race/ethnicities, as well as culture-bound syndromes will be briefly discussed as considerations for conceptualizing client cases. Attendees are encouraged to share their lived experiences and professional expertise to co-construct a dialogue related to ethically and effectively working with Asian American clients.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and Presents:

Courageous Conversations: Mental Health, Policy, and Legislation

Thursday, March 7th, 2019 from 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm MST

Dèsa Karye Daniel, M.A., LMHC, NCC

Tanupreet Suri, M.S., LPCC (NM), LMHC (NY), NCC

Arianna Trott, M.A., LPCC, NCC

**no CEUs will be offered for this webinar

Dèsa Karye Daniel, M.A., LMHC, NCC is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor and a Counselor Education & Supervision 3rd year doctoral student at the University of New Mexico. She is a University of New Mexico Center for Health Policy Fellow. Daniel research interest focuses on supervision relationships for racial/ethnic minorities, the lived experiences of racial/ethnic college students, and the lived experiences of Black/African American Women in academic spaces. She received her dual master’s degrees in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Higher Education Administration from New Mexico State University. Ms. Daniel continues to work with diverse clients at a community mental health clinic and a college counseling center where her work focuses on the Black student populations. Ms. Daniel is the 2018-2019 Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (AMCD) Professional Committee Chair. She currently serves as the Division 45 Student Representative of the American Psychology Association and is the Chair-Elect for AERA Graduate Student Council. Ms. Daniel plays an active role in student leadership and was awarded the 2018. Toy Caldwell-Colbert Distinguished Student Service Award for Division 45. She continues to advocate for inclusive spaces for racial/ethnic minority students within academia and within organizations for increasing graduate student resources. Instagram: Blackacademic.

Tanupreet Suri, M.S., LMHC (NY), LPCC (NM), NCC is a doctoral student at the University of New Mexico. Her focus is on the intersection of technology and mental health, and college student mental health, particularly students of color within higher education. Tanu has an extensive background working with a range of populations in various areas, including community health, health education, awareness, promotion, and wellness. She also has additional experience working with the college-aged population providing one on one therapy, group therapy and mental health outreach on college campuses. Her research and practice interests include college-student mental health, experiences of minority students within higher education, social media and new technology’s role in identity development, student services in higher education institutions, civic engagement as a catalyst for identity development, integrating ways of traditional healing in counseling, community based participatory actions, and social justice advocacy. Tanu also holds independent licenses to practice mental health counseling in both New York and New Mexico and the NCC.

Preferred Gender Pronouns: she, her, hers

Arianna Trott, M.A., LPCC, NCC obtained her Bachelor’s in Psychology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon and her master’s degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from the University of New Mexico. She is currently a doctoral student in Counselor Education at the University of New Mexico in the Department of Education, volunteers at Indian Health Services, and works as a consultant and graduate assistant. Arianna’s career is focused on promoting social justice, equity, cultural humility, and interpersonal communication as trainer, consultant, and independently licensed counselor in New Mexico. Her expertise includes training in community-based participatory research, trauma-informed counseling, and program evaluation and statistical analysis in behavioral health, substance abuse prevention, and early childhood development and education.

Session Summary:

Attendees during this presentation can expect practical examples of how to get involved within their local and national legislative processes. Specifically, the presenters will provide examples of why it is important to know about your local, state, and national political climate. Issues related to mental health in your state as well as nationally can have an impact on power/privilege dynamics, multiple race/ethnicities, as well as cultural implications. Attendees are encouraged to share their own experiences at all levels of governance and how this advocacy has supported their diverse counseling communities.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development and AAPI Presents:

Career Counseling and Wellness Issues for Asian Americans

This webinar is also co-sponsored by AAPI

On March 12th 2019 from 2:00 – 3:30pm EST

Dr. Monica P. Band, Ed.D., CRC, NCC

Christian D. Chan, PhD, NCC

Monica P. Band, Ed.D., CRC, NCC is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Marymount University, Virginia Counselors Association President, Member of the American Counseling Association’s (ACA) Presidential Task Force: Cultural Encounters, Member of the Association for Adult Development and Aging Emerging Adult Task Force, and Member of the ACA’s Branch Development Committee. Her general research interests include multicultural counseling and pedagogy, career development, Asian American issues, multicultural identity development, application of clinical practice working with biracial/ethnic and multiracial/ethnic populations. Her professional experiences include: residential counseling services, rehabilitation state agency services, community outpatient settings, crisis response services, and, most recent, individual/couples counseling in a private practice setting. She is the recipient of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development’s 2018 Exemplarity Diversity Leadership Award as well as the 2018 Humanitarian and Caring Person of the Year Award by the Prince William County Regional Counselors Association. She continues to contribute to the profession through service, leadership, and contributing to peer-reviewed publications and referred personations at the international, national, regional, and state levels. She is a co-host of the CounselorAudioSource 2.0 Podcast on the PodTalk Network.

Dr. Christian D. Chan, PhD, NCC is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Idaho State University, Member-at-Large, Outreach and Advocacy for the Association for Adult Development and Aging, Co-Chair of the American Counseling Association Branch Development Committee, and Co-Chair of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Strategic Planning Committee. His interests revolve around intersectionality; multiculturalism in counseling, supervision, and counselor education; social justice; career development; critical research methods; acculturative stress; intergenerational conflict; and cultural factors in identity development and socialization. His prior professional experiences include case management with foster care adolescents, career development, higher education administration, and individual, couples, parent-child, group, and family counseling services. In addition to serving as a recent recipient of the ACA Courtland C. Lee Multicultural Excellence Scholarship Award and ACA Robert Rencken Emerging Professional Leader Award, he actively contributes to peer-reviewed publications in journals, books, and edited volumes and over 90 refereed presentations at the national, regional, and state levels.

Session Summary:

Occupational segregation is evident in the unbalanced occupational distribution of Asian Americans in the workforce (Leong & Chou, 1994). According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2010), Asian Americans continue to be overrepresented in science and technology fields (e.g., computer engineering, chemistry, and materials science) and underrepresented in social service and human service professions. This disproportionate distribution reinforces a misconception of Asian Americans (Tang, Fouad & Smith, 1998). In addition, parental pressure has a statistically significant association with more culturally valued college majors and career choices among Asian American college students. Asian American parents’ biases towards math and science careers predicted their children’s preferences towards the same careers (Roysircar et al., 2010). Furthermore, Asian American parents tend to value and encourage their children to pursue prestigious and secure occupations. Occupational stereotypes develop due to occupational segregation towards culturally valued careers (Leung et al., 2004). These stereotypes may lead practitioners to believe Asian Americans are adept in culturally valued careers (e.g., physical, biological, and medical sciences) and less capable in non-culturally valued careers (i.e., careers involving verbal, persuasive, and social skills). Additionally, stereotypes create several barriers to explore non-stereotypical vocations and prevent stereotype internalization, especially for Asian Americans. In career development, as Leong (1993) discussed, Asian Americans may not choose a career based on their own interests or intentions but on the whole family’s mission.

Learning Objectives:

  • To critically examine present treatment and current issues related to the use of family systems approach and intersectionality framework as it applies to career identities of Asian Americans.
  • Identify practical tools and recommendations for application of theory when working with Asian American clients in general.
  • Identify positionality as practitioners and Counselor Educators as it relates to the therapeutic process when working with Asian American clients.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:

Successfully Navigating the Faculty Search

Dr. Michael Brooks, LPC, Dr. Asha Dickerson, LPC, Dr. Taunya Tinsley, LPC

January 3, 2019, Noon to 1 p.m. est.

The presenters believe there is a need for specific conversations regarding student professionalism. Interviewing skills, conference etiquette, and appropriate communication are not clearly and consistently discussed as part of a student’s graduate curricula. It is believed that there are hidden rules regarding professionalism that some students, including students of color, are unaware of that may impact their transition from their doctoral program to academia. Strategies for obtaining employment will be provided.

Attendees will be informed of how to properly construct an effective cover letter, time management, and face to face interview preparation for counselor education faculty positions as well as clinical mental health counseling positions. The presenters will stress the importance of connecting the interviewees graduate training from their doctoral or masters program, including the CACREP standards, to their applicant profile and their phone, video and/or face-to-face interviews.

Attendees will receive a list of “dos and don’ts” regarding professional conference etiquette. This will include attire, grooming, cocktail behavior, and content session management. Additionally, participants will be encouraged to develop their elevator spiel. Lastly, presenters will create dialogue around ways to develop a professional wardrobe.

Attendees will be informed on: Opening and closing salutations, word annunciations, and principles essential to good oral and written communication; gaining useful and pragmatic strategies for communicating in a variety of workplace situations; how to speak, write, and listen with increased confidence and competence; and ways to enhance leadership skills and opportunities for career promotion.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:

Creating & Cultivating Equity: Grant Writing & Medically Underserved Communities

Angie D. Cartwright, PhD, LPC-S, LSOTP-S, NCC

Peggy Ceballos, PhD, NCC, CCPT-S, CPRT-S

Chandra D. Carey, PhD, CRC

Jose “Joey” Tapia-Fuselier, Jr., M.S., CRC, LPC, NCC

January 10, 2019 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m CST

Session Summary: 

Are you looking for ways to foster cultural competence for your internship students? If so, please join us for a webinar on grant writing, integrated care, and behavioral health services for medically underserved communities (MUCs). In this session, attendees will learn creative ways to transform internship experiences for their students by learning techniques to establish new clinical partnership sites and ways equip counselors in training with skills to reach MUCs and diverse populations.

Angie Cartwright, PhD, LPC-S, LSOTP-S, NCC

Co-Primary Investigator/ Project Director

Dr. Cartwright is an Assistant Professor in the University of North Texas’ Counseling Program. She has both firsthand knowledge and extensive work experience with underserved communities, behavioral health, and integrated care settings. Dr. Cartwright advocates for evidenced-based prevention models and an increase in an adequately trained mental health workforce. Dr. Cartwright has been recognized at the national level for her leadership and work with underserved populations. As primary investigator and project director, Dr. Cartwright will manage the project, ensure implementation and prescribed activities are carried out in accordance with objectives, and coordinate project activities.

Chandra Carey, PhD, CRC

Co-Primary Investigator

Dr. Carey is an Associate Professor and Interim Chair at the University of North Texas in the Department of Rehabilitation and Health Services. As the co-primary investigator, Dr. Carey will oversee the development of the SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Solutions training modules, assist with project evaluation and data collection, and communicate and/or serve as the university supervisor for RHS students during their clinical internship.

Peggy Ceballos, PhD, NCC, CCPT-S, CPRT-S

Co-Primary Investigator

Dr. Ceballos is an Associate Professor at the University of North Texas’s Counseling Program. As co-primary investigator, Dr. Ceballos will oversee the development of the culturally and linguistically responsive clinical training, assist with project evaluation and data collection, and communicate and/or serve as the university supervisor for CHE students during their internship.

Jose “Joey” Tapia-Fuselier, M.S., CRC, LPC

Graduate Research Assistant

Mr. Tapia-Fuselier (pronouns: he, him, his) is currently pursuing his doctoral degree in counseling at the University of North Texas (UNT). He earned his Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling at UNT. Mr. Tapia-Fuselier has served clients with disabilities in public and private rehabilitation settings as well as, in private practice. He now serves clients across the lifespan with a focus on disability in three languages: English, Spanish, and American Sign Language. Mr. Tapia-Fuselier’s clinical focus is working with marginalized and under-represented populations. His research interests include bilingualism in counseling and supervision, couples and inter-partner relationship counseling, and intervention-based counseling for people with disabilities across the lifespan. As Graduate Research Assistant, Mr. Tapia-Fuselier will contribute to the development and delivery of trainings and workshops, assist with on-going data collection, entry and analysis.

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:

Focus on the Family: An Integrative Framework for Counseling Athletes Across the Lifespan

Dr. Taunya Marie Tinsley, LPC, NCC & Jerry Jasmin Time, MA

Feb 7, 2019 1:45 PM EST

Session Summary:

Sports is a microcosm of society – athletes are human, too. The same issues we experience as a general population can also be experienced by the athlete population. Often times, however, we hail athletes as heroes, so much so that we forget that they are in fact human. For this reason, the athlete population is a subculture that is marginalized in regard to the topic of mental health. The psycho emotional needs of youth, high school, collegiate and professional athletes is an issue that is often overlooked, or even ignored by the general public. Anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicidality are among concerns that are common in this unique population. Resultantly, there needs to be a continued push to establish an organized presence of counselors, educators, students, and related professionals to provide sports counseling resources.

The Focus on the Family: An Integrative Framework for Counseling Athletes Across the Lifespan webinar may meet the particular interests of a sub-sector of counselors who work with the athlete population in a variety of settings including k-12 schools, colleges and universities, private practice, clinical mental health agencies, and professional sporting agencies. This webinar will examine current counseling strategies to counteract concerns that athletes across the lifespan and their families experience.

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will examine current research on the developmental concerns of athletes across the lifespan as well as the best practices to counteract these concerns

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will discover how to apply family systems therapy techniques to mitigate familial concerns that are caused by sports and familial concerns that can affect an athlete’s sports performance.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will review corrosive communication patterns and negative cycles of interaction among athletes and their family members and identify evidence-based skills and techniques from couples counseling interventions to apply with athletes and their family members.

Counseling Approaches in Working With Military Families Shon D. Smith

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents: AMCD Membership Webinar Series

Counseling Approaches in Working with Military Families

Dr. Smith has worked with over 300 veterans and military families over his professional career. A veteran of Operation Enduring Freedom, SSG Smith has been deployed to Afghanistan, Iraq and North Africa and served on humanitarian missions in Central and South America. Dr. Smith understands first hand of the impact deployment has on service members and their families. This training will help prepare current and future counselors to provide evidence-based, culturally competent services in the area of deployment and families. This training provides an overview of military culture including its history, organizational structure, core values, branches of the service, mission, and operations. In addition, it examines military deployment and the unique experiences that service members, their spouses, and their children face throughout the deployment cycle. The presentation incorporates research findings to discuss stressors and challenges associated with separations, reunions, and reintegration.
Learning Objectives

  • Identify military terminology and operations in order to facilitate effective treatment of military personnel.
  • Identify stressors faced by service members and their families before, during and after deployment.
  • Discuss the adaptive skills used by service members while in a combat zone that can be problematic, when applied at home, as well as effective strategies for facilitating healthy and positive reunions between returning service members and their families.

**Disclaimer**
The zoom link for this webinar will be emailed approximately 24 hours before the scheduled event to the email you used to register for a ticket. Please kindly add the Event Brite platform to your safe sender list or check your junk mail. Dr. Smith will be presenting on Counseling Approaches in Working with Military Families. This is a recorded webinar for future AMCD use. As such, we remind you to kindly mute your devices as you are joining our meeting. Dr. Smith will allocate time towards the end of the webinar for any questions guest might have. Guests are welcome to type their questions into the chat box or ask questions verbally. By asking questions verbally, you agree to AMCD’s media recording rights and understand that your voice as well as your video will be recorded as well. Moreover, the AMCD Professional Development Committee holds the rights to dismiss guests, mute guests, and moderate guests as needed.

Date: November 8, 2018
Time: 2:00 – 3:30 P.M. EST
Registration: Register Here

Paranormal Issues in Counseling Flyer

Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development Presents:
DSM 5 Cultural Formations: Paranormal Issues in Counseling

Dr. Michele Kerulis, core faculty with Counseling@Northwestern is a lifestyle & wellness expert who helps individuals achieve lifelong wellness through developing healthy mind, body, and spirit. Dr. Kerulis helps successful people who are committed to excellence reach substantial goals through individualized consultation.

Link released shortly before the event.

Date: October 23, 2018
Time: 2:30 – 3:30 P.M. CST
Registration: Register Here

This is an AMCD membership benefit and free to AMCD members.
For further questions, please contact Desa Daniel @ dkdaniel@unm.edu 

Microaggressions and the Intersection of Persons of Color, LGBTQ Identities, and People with Disabilities: Implications for Counseling

A Free NBCC APPROVED Webinar
Date: August 27, 2018
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 P.M. EST
Registration: Register Here

Download the Flyer
Watch the Webinar